Autel evo diy multi charger

Discussion in 'EVO' started by Evo man, Jul 26, 2018.

  1. Autel evo and mavic pro share the same pin out.i have successfully charged 3 evo batts and controller in a hour
     

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  2. Just need to trim bottom lip off of mavic charge plug line it up with evo battery and your off to the races.your all welcome
     

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  3. Enjoy
     

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  4. Having an electrical engineer for a father is both a blessing and a curse…

    As soon as I saw the EVO battery I was asking whether the pinouts matched, meaning I could charge my EVO batteries from my Mavic 3 in 1 charger. Now, knowing that the pinouts do indeed match, I still feel the need for more homework before trusting this.

    So I’ve just ordered three charger blocks from Autel ($177) instead of another Mavic 3 in 1 ($40) to alter as described.

    My brother lost several priceless guitars when an electrical “short-cut” caused the heater to burn down his barn. He had the money to pay an electrician $$$ to wire the heater correctly. Instead, he let a friend, who “knew what he was doing” wire the heater, losing $$$$$$.

    That said, this is useful knowledge. Thanks for posting!
     
  5. Waste of money lol
     
  6. While the Mavic and Evo share the same 'pin-outs', they do not share the same firmware and software. Thus, what may be a 'full-charge' on one, may be an incomplete charge on the other - even though the battery indicates that it is fully charged. There is more to a marriage between a lithium battery and a charger, besides voltage and pin-out.
     
  7. I've been charging my evo this way since release.fully charges batteries no problems to speak of.do as you wish sit and wait for hours to charge your batts.
     
  8. Just wondering if many more are using your interesting method.

    Good work
     
  9. #9 mixchief, Sep 17, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2018
    I am, I have a "universal charger" I bought from Amazon, it's made for and has cables for DJI Phantom 4, Mavic and Inspire 1. I modified the Mavic connectors and charge my EVO batteries 3 at a time plus if I want I can also charge the RC at the same time. No problems. The charger does not have the intelligent circuitry, the battery does.
     
  10. pretty slick there Evo Man.

    what is the output voltage of the standard charger? what is the output voltage of the aftermarket ones?
    i'm looking at the DroneMax MP18A (for Mavic Pro) and it's listing 17.5v output. :eek:
    shouldn't the output be 13.05 volts for 3 cell batteries like the original Mavic, and Evo?

    cheers
    /max
     
  11. can't tell you exactly as I haven't put a tester to it, it has 3 different settings for the different craft so it must be copping the factory output in each.
     
  12. Does this mean the battery caps sold on Amazon for the Mavic Pro would fit on Evo batteries?



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  13. When building a lithium battery multicharger, there is much more to it than simply wiring a second plug in parallel with the first (main) plug. In fact, if you do wire each plug in parallel with each other, it will not work properly and the end result could be a fire. A properly built multicharger includes microprocessors and circuitry so that each battery will be completely and independently charged from the other battery. I've seen where other people (on another Autel) forum tried to build their own multicharger, and even home-build chargers which perform discharge cycles which are different from the charging routines that are developed by the OEM manufacturer. I would not advise trying to build a LITHIUM battery charger, or multicharger, unless you are skilled in electronics and knowledgeable in Lithium technology.
     
  14. #14 Agustine, Nov 28, 2018
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 3, 2019
    Smart packs have a small battery management processor (AKA battery management system or BMS) board in them that monitor each individual cell at all times. The BMS usually has a serial data connection to the flight controller to report battery stats etc.

    The BMS performs cell balancing at the end of full charge as it has access to each individual cell. The critical element in this setup is the chargers used with smart batteries are fixed voltage, current limited power supplies. The fixed voltage is quite specific to each model based on battery chemistry.

    When a pack is being charged, the current flow is high (up to the set current limit), and then tapers off as the pack voltage rises to the fixed power supply voltage. When the current drops to a certain low value, the BMS then performs the balancing of the cells. When the current is close to zero, the pack voltage matches the power supply and the BMS turns off the pack, disconnects from the power supply.

    So yes, you can use a straight power supply, as long as you know the exact voltage to set and don't allow too high a current at the beginning of the charge.

    The BMS will disconnect the battery for safety reasons if the charger voltage is too high (to prevent overcharge), or too low (pack won't fully charge), or if the current is too high. The BMS basically is there to prevent any dangerous condition for the lithium cells.

    Smart chips are very well documented and weren't invented for drones. eBikes are big users, as there are tons of cells in their packs that are monitored and balanced this way.

    I have no idea what your background is. Mine is electronics and RC. I've been flying RC for 52 years now and have flown electrics since they were invented, well before lithiums came on the scene. I've also had the first smart battery powered Phantom Vision, then P2, P2V+, P3P, Inspire, P4, Mavic Pro, Spark, Mavic Air, Mavic2 Pro, so I have a bit of DJI smart battery experience.

    Yes, one must respect the battery charge and discharge current limits but this can be done with other equipment.

    I designed a universal discharger for my packs but with the self discharge I use it much less.

    Here's a data sheet on a typical smart chip, you can get the gist of how it functions from the block diagram. It manages to charge and balance the battery with only a + and - connection to the outside world.


    Smart Battery IC TDS .jpg
     
  15. Has anyone dissected a bad battery to get a look at the BMS board on an Evo battery? I expect this would have to be done with extreme caution on a fully discharged battery otherwise bad things could happen.


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  16. Man, it may work.But no way am I "trimming" or "cutting" anything on my Evo just to force it to work. It won't be long before a third party comes out with a multi charger. Autel will probably make one themselves. If you damage your batteries by doing this your warranty will be void. I have. 4 batteries and I have no issue keeping all of them charged.
     
  17. Go back and re read, the trimming is on the charge plug not the batteries. I would never do this either but for different reasons.
     
  18. I just want confirmation that I understand, as I don't know much. I don't see any car chargers for the EVO. My Jeep has a 24 volt electrical system. Ebay item
    ebay.com/itm/273575231253
    has these specs:
    1>.Product name: DC-DC step-down module
    2>.Product model: XH-M407
    3>.Input voltage: DC4-40V
    4>.Output voltage: DC1.25-36V
    5>.Output current: Max. 8A
    6>.Output power: Max. 250W
    7>.Switching frequency: 180KHZ
    Will that work? How should I set the output voltage? I've been doing something similar for a lead-acid motor cycle battery to keep my internet connection up during blackouts and it works fine. Antenna needs 29.5 volts and router needs 9 volts, so I use step up and step down converters. I use an AC powered switching power supply set to 13.4 volts to keep the battery charged. I'd go higher but I use the same power for my speakers and laptop cooling board.
    reply to #14 GForman
    I just want confirmation that I understand, as I don't know much. I don't see any car chargers for the EVO. My Jeep has a 24 volt electrical system. Ebay item
    ebay.com/itm/273575231253
    has these specs:
    1>.Product name: DC-DC step-down module
    2>.Product model: XH-M407
    3>.Input voltage: DC4-40V
    4>.Output voltage: DC1.25-36V
    5>.Output current: Max. 8A
    6>.Output power: Max. 250W
    7>.Switching frequency: 180KHZ
    Will that work? How should I set the output voltage? I've been doing something similar for a lead-acid motor cycle battery to keep my internet connection up during blackouts and it works fine. Antenna needs 29.5 volts and router needs 9 volts, so I use step up and step down converters. I use an AC powered switching power supply set to 13.4 volts to keep the battery charged. I'd go higher but I use the same power for my speakers and laptop cooling board.
     
  19. So received the multi charger in the mail today as you have shown above and I can see that it will fit as you show with the lip cut off, however it has less pins than the battery has slots for. evoconnectors.jpeg
    Can you please confirm that this is the same as your setup? Thank you
     
  20. So received the multi charger in the mail today as you have shown above and I can see that it will fit as you show with the lip cut off, however it has less pins than the battery has slots for. [​IMG]
    Can you please confirm that this is the same as your setup? Thank you
     

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