So how do you know

Discussion in 'General' started by jjpish, Jan 3, 2018.

  1. where you can fly? I know the FAA rules but I discovered today and entire town that is a no fly zone. I was in the ocean city md area today for work and had my x star with me and was going to fly around th beach a little before I headed back home. I decided I should google before I flew and ocean city is a no fly zone. The entire town.... now I have seen plenty of drone video of ocean city on YouTube but....
     
  2. I think you answered your own question. You go online (go to the FCC site) and do an internet search for "drone no-fly zones"
     
  3. There are cellphone apps that give airport restrictions on a map showing your position. I use one called Hover.
    It gives you solar interference conditions and weather also.
     
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  4. So for Ocean City, MD, there are 2 airspace concerns - a heliport located near I50/I113 and the Ocean City Municipal Airport. The heliport serves the Atlantic General Hospital. I would contact the airport and notify them of your intention to fly in the beach are (or wherever) including location of flight, time (from/to) and height AGL. Also, ask them if additional ATC notification is necessary. It's posted that ATC requires notification as well but the airport may choose to handle any notifications to pilots in the area. They will be the ones to notify any Medi-vac flight of your presence unless otherwise directed. Better to CYA. Then go fly.

    One source of this info can be found at

    http://knowbeforeyoufly.org/air-space-map/

    There are mobile apps as well.

    Hope that alleviates concerns you may have. Once you make a call or 2, you'll get the hang of the info they want in the order they prefer making it a seamless and simple process

    CAVU
     
    jjpish likes this.
  5. I might also point out that the FAA and “other entities” (cities, parks, forests, etc.) have very diffeent ideas about no flight areas. The FAA controls the air; other entities can only control what happens on the ground. So for instance, areas administered by the National Park Service are “no fly zones” because the NPS has said no takeoffs or landing on their land. However, they do not control the air above the land, so theoretically you can take off outside their boundaries and fly over. (It would be rude and harmful to the hobby, but legal.) I think that municipal regulations would have to be the same.
     
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